Friday, October 14, 2011

Cwazy Wabbits

My 13-year-old daughter came to me earlier this week and groaned, "Our field trip on Thursday might get canceled!" Oh, dear. What happened? "We don't have enough parents to chaperone!" I was shocked. Her science teacher had organized a trip to the . . . sand and gravel pit. I couldn't believe that the classroom door hadn't been knocked off its hinges by excited moms and dads pushing through to get to the sign-up sheet. I mean, who wouldn't want to accompany a group of 8th graders on a tour of rock piles? "Please chaperone, Mom. PLEASE?!" My daughter begged.

Turns out, I learned something. Mainly, the difference between concrete and cement. They are not interchangeable terms, people. Cement is a powdery ingredient—along with water, sand, gravel, and chemicals—in concrete. As the civil engineer leading the tour put it, "Cement is to concrete as flour is to bread." Also, cement comes on big ships from Korea. And I do not like the color grey when it comes to concrete blocks. Too institutional, if you ask me. I prefer buff or terra cotta.

Oh, one more thing. Oblivious rabbits hop around sand and gravel pits.
I think I've found an animal dumber cuter than moose.





Dinner last night: spaghetti, corn, green salad

Exactly two years ago:

Exactly three years ago:




5 comments:

Betsy said...

Well, good for you for saving the class trip! ;) And you learned something, too...can't beat that.

Heather said...

yeah and I think there is also that whole thing about who wants to go on a class trip with middleschoolers!

That is so weird about the rabbits!

Katherine said...

You are a good parent. I love that schools are still going on field trips, even if it is to the sand and gravel pit. Hey, it beats the sewer sanitation plant.

Deidre said...

I always hated it when my parents chaperoned school trips.

that cement v. concrete discussion sounds scintillating.

Karen Peterson said...

I've often found that a lot of those tours are way more interesting than I think they're going to be.